Women's record

The history of the women’s Fell Record is, unfortunately yet inevitably, substantially shorter than that of the men’s record. The upside is that there is more excitement left to come, with a wider range of new fells to be added to the route.

 

It is important to note that the men’s and women’s rounds incorporate different circuits of fells. Indeed, this interesting facet of history will never change, as many of the peaks embedded within the women’s record are now ineligible for adding to men’s rounds given they fall foul of today’s distance and prominence rules laid down by the Bob Graham Club. These fells are Sale How, Calfhow Pike, Stirrup Crag, Looking Stead and Kirk Fell East Top. This has some interesting implications for the routes that contenders take between the fells.

Note: [idnx] refers to newspaper references; [idx] refers to all other sources. Full references are available here

 

Note: [endx] notation refers to the "endeavour code", essentially a unique identifier for each record attempt or walk. A full reference table will soon be available.

 

Contents:

 

JEAN DAWES'S INAUGURAL ROUND [endw1]

Date: 25 / 26 June 1977

Start / finish: Keswick, 8am / 7.27am [23 hours 27 minutes]

Route: Clockwise round of Bob Graham’s 42 peaks

Peaks: 42

Contender: Jean Dawes

Support and pacing: Boyd Millen. Anne-Marie Grindley, Pete Dawes, Stan Bradshaw and Chris Bland

 

Account

 

Jean Dawes’s first attempt on the round was on 31 July 1976 [endw0]. Dawes was well supported, including by 64-year-old Stan Bradshaw. She went well until Wasdale, then began to feel the effects of the round. She had a first bad batch going up Great Gable but remained largely on schedule at Honister. She left the quarry at 9pm with 3 hours to go – doable but hard. Unfortunately, by the final peak she was “asleep on her feet” [id005].

 

Before setting off, she had said she intended to complete the round no matter how long it took. And so it proved: Dawes arrived back in Keswick 50 minutes after the 24 hours. Perhaps her energies had been sapped by recent support provided to her husband on another, longer challenge (the traverse of Ben Nevis and Scafell Pike).

 

Jean set out again one year later in June 1977. Leg one was in rain and mist, but the weather did not dent progress. After a ten-minute rest in Threlkeld, the traverse of the Dodds was also made in the clouds. Fred Rogerson met her atop Seat Sandal, before a 26-minute stop at Dunmail.

 

Some fatigue-based doubt crept in during leg three, but she kept going. A 33-minute stop at Wasdale followed, these longer stops being usual practice for the time. In a potentially problematic reprise of 1978, she nearly fell asleep on a Kirk Fell boulder, but the leg was completed without further incident. She made it back to Moot Hall with over half an hour to spare on the 24 hours.

 

Dawes was club member 66, the first ‘lady member’ and the inaugural holder of the Women’s 24-Hour Fell Record.

 

Stan Bradshaw (now 65) started with Jean at Moot Hall and completed the round as well, his second full completion but clocking in at 25 hours. Chris Bland also set off with Dawes and registered a formal completion. Boyd Millen did 39 peaks in support, going the whole way from Threlkeld.

ANNE-MARIE GRINDLEY GOES FASTER [endw2]

Date: 17 / 18 June 1978

Start / finish: Keswick, [start time not known] [21 hours 5 minutes]

Route: Anti-clockwise round of Bob Graham’s 42 peaks

Peaks: 42

Contender: Anne-Marie Grindley

Support and pacing included: Jean Dawes and Stan Bradshaw

 

Account

 

“Ladies: may I recommend the Bob Graham Round to you – all those lovely men waiting on you hand and foot!” – so reported Anne-Marie Grindley in the opening line of her report on her record round.

 

She benefitted from fantastic weather and was up on schedule throughout. Indeed, a pacer failed to meet her as she had passed through the planned meeting point too early.

 

Anne-Marie and her husband (Will) were the first husband and wife to complete the round together.

GRINDLEY EXTENDS [endw4]

Date: 30 June 1979

Start / finish: Keswick, [start time not known] [23 hours 20 minutes]

Route: Bob Graham’s 42 peaks, plus Lonscale Fell, Skiddaw Little Man, Sale How, Calfhow Pike, Pavey Ark, Loft Crag, Stirrup Crag, Scoat Fell, Looking Stead, Kirkfell East Top, Whiteless Pike, Wandope, Eel Crag, Sail, Scar Crags and Causey Pike

Peaks: 58

Contender: Anne-Marie Grindley

Support and pacing included: [not known]

 

Account

 

Feeling that she could go further, Anne-Marie Grindley set out in the following year (1979) to be the first women to add further peaks to the Fell Record.

 

Given the rules of the record, her choices would quite literally set the course that future record-breakers would need to take.

 

She discussed her additions with Fred Rogerson in advance, agreeing that a peak could be included if it was surrounded by at least two 50-foot contours (i.e. 100-foot prominence, around 30 metres). This led to the inclusion of a number of tops that would fall foul of the modern-day rules for peaks. But that was no different from those ineligible peaks already baked into the men’s record (for example, Scoat Fell and Coomb Height).

 

“As the first female to do more than 42, I felt it was my choice of route” [id092]. In her own words, some of her selected fells were “controversial” [id143]. But, regardless, Grindley clearly added a substantive mileage to the route, largely in the north-western fells. If anyone felt the additional peaks were ‘soft’, the record was, of course, waiting on a plate for anyone who wanted to break it!

 

It was a particularly busy weekend in June when Grindley set out from Moot Hall. At a similar time, Ros Coats embarked on what would become her Bob Graham record time of 20 hours and 31 minutes. Depending on start times, Coats may even have technically been the women’s Fell Record holder between arriving back at Moot Hall and Grindley finishing! That same weekend, Roger Baumeister completed the second double BGR and the first under 48 hours.

ANNE STENTIFORD RAISES THE BAR [endw5]

Date: 15 / 16 July 1994

Start / finish: [start location unknown], [start time unknown] [23 hours 17 minutes]

Route: Clockwise round of Anne-Marie Grindley’s 58 peaks, plus Catstycam, Lingmell, Haycock and Grasmoor

Peaks: 62

Contender: Anne Stentiford

Support and pacing: A team of 14

 

Account

 

In 1991, three years earlier, Anne Stentiford set a new fastest women’s time for the Bob Graham Round of 18 hours and 49 minutes. She had broken the women’s record for the Paddy Buckley Round only a month earlier.

 

Come July 1994, she set out on a round 20 fells longer, attempting to add four to Anne-Marie Grindley’s tally. Her attempt on the record was said to be inspired by talking to Mark Hartell, whom she had met at Macclesfield Harriers.

 

Catstycam and Lingmell were added in legs two and three, respectively. By Wasdale, the good weather was turning warm, which meant Anne struggled to eat much beyond this point in the round (15 hours in).

 

Haycock was added in leg four – this fell still has not been included in the men’s record (Kim Collison considered it, but he decided to add Fleetwith Pike instead). Anne had scheduled to also include Fleetwith Pike in her round, but she chose to skip it in order to preserve time. In the final leg, she then realised she had time in hand and so Grasmoor was added on the hoof. Looking back, she felt she could have made it to Fleetwith and Grasmoor (she probably could have, but the margin on the 24 hours would have been very tight).

NICKY SPINKS [endw6]

Date: 2 / 3 July 2011

Start / finish: Stair, 3am / 2.15am [23 hours 15 minutes]

Route: Clockwise round of Anne Stentiford’s 62 peaks, plus Fleetwith Pike and Sand Hill

Peaks: 64

Contender: Nicky Spinks

 

Account

 

By 2011, Nicky Spinks had yet to break the women’s Bob Graham Round record, which she went on to do in 2012 and again in 2015.

 

For her attempt on the Fell Record, her two main planned additions were Fleetwith Pike and Sand Hill. Grisedale Pike could also be included if time allowed.

 

Uniquely to both the men’s and women’s record, she decided to start at Stair, albeit with a similar rationale for why most others start in Braithwaite. By leaving at 3am, the intention was to complete the road section in darkness and ensure that any “spare time” at the end would also be dark time, ensuring no daylight would be wasted.

 

Spinks gained time over the initial northern fells, perhaps because Stentiford had completed them in the dark. Dawn broke over this leg, bringing what would be a hot day. She flew down the parachute route off Blencathra, arriving in Threlkeld 25 minutes up on the schedule.

 

Leg two also went well, in spite of the heat. She hardly paused at Dunmail, having planned in advance on how to minimise time spent at the support points. She suffered from some short-lived stomach trouble at the start of leg three, but she felt good by the time she was surprised by Anne Johnson (nee Stentiford) on Harrison Stickle, who had come to wish her well.

 

There was more stomach trouble over the Scafell massif, but nothing that proved fundamentally detrimental to the round. She took Broad Stand to gain Scafell. By Wasdale she was nearly 50 minutes up on schedule. Leg four had good points and bad points, and a few more minutes was gained.

 

However, at the end of the short leg five, some confusion with the pacing team meant that the wrong descent line was taken from Robinson to Newlands Hause (presumably over the marsh rather than the quicker way down). This clearly frustrated an already-tired Spinks and led to the conclusion that there would be insufficient time to include Grisedale Peak, the potential 65th peak.

 

The decision to omit was confirmed during the final leg, with just Sand Hill added. It was a difficult leg, but Nicky was still able to run in to Stair. In the end, she was comfortably within the 24 hours.

GRINDLEY EXTENDS [endw7]

Date: 30 August 2020

Start / finish: Braithwaite, midnight / 11.27pm [23 hours and 27 minutes]

Route: Clockwise round of Nicky Spinks’s 64 peaks, plus Grisedale Pike

Peaks: 65

Contenders: Carol Morgan

Support and pacing included: Kim Collison

 

Account

 

Carol Morgan set out from Braithwaite at the end of the Covid-infused summer of FKTs. In contrast with Nicky Spinks, she set out from Braithwaite rather than Stair, reflecting her intention to add Grisedale Pike at the end of the round.

 

After a successful round, she arrived back with just under three minutes to spare (two minutes and 47 seconds), completing her schedule to add Grisedale Pike.

 

Morgan is an Irish ultra-runner, coached by Kim Collision. They are now Vice-President and President of the Bob Graham Club, respectively.